Photo Courtesy of Kentucky-Map.org

                                                                                                                 Photo Courtesy of Kentucky-Map.org

          JANE JACOBS (1916 — 2006)

          JANE JACOBS (1916 — 2006)

"the street works harder than any other part of downtown...

it is the nervous system;
it communicates the flavor, the feel, the sights...

it is the major point of transaction and communication." 

— Jane Jacobs

   Photo Courtesy of: Abebooks.com

   Photo Courtesy of: Abebooks.com

Community-minded projects, such as Curb'd, invest in place and are an important part of the neighborhood revitalization process.

By investing in innovative parklet installations on the streets of Covington we hope to bolster the surrounding community.

Commonly referred to as "placemaking" this process is becoming more popular, although it's not a new idea!

As early as the 1960s activists and community leaders, like Jane Jacobs, recognized the need for grassroots movements aimed at improving the urban core. This approach relies on a "bottom-up" style of community planning that stems from neighbors, not development corporations. 

This movement revolves around the ridiculous idea that cities should be designed for people, not just cars and shopping centers. This investment in place manifests itself in a variety of ways, like public art and green spaces, but ultimately leads to a boost in local economies and community-interaction. Founded in 1975, the nonprofit organization Project For Public Spaces has expanded on the ideas of leaders like Jane Jacobs and William "Holly" Whyte in order to develop a variety of tools for communities to evaluate place. The criteria is derived from 11 key principles that outline the revitalization process.

                                                                                                                                     Photo Courtesy of: PPS.org

Placemaking has the ability to inspire people to collectively reimagine and reinvent public spaces throughout their city. Curb'd recognizes that creating compelling public art is only part of the equation, the other important component is YOU!

Our belief is that revitalization starts on the corner and then spreads to the block through community interaction. So join us, won’t you? Be a part of this one-of-a-kind experience by volunteering your skills, sharing and tagging online and (of course) experiencing parklets first hand in 2016!